Facebook Pixel
custom_html_banner1

 

Glipizide - Generic Glucotrol

In stock
SKU
Glipizide
As low as $0.30

How it works

Step 1. Have a Prescription

Just upload a photo of your prescription after checkout. You can also text us a picture of your prescription or prescription label to 561-619-5169. We will call your doctor to confirm the prescription or he can "escript"(send electronically) it to our pharmacy at Mint Pharmacy and Skin Clinic, 1201 US Hwy 1 ste 305C, North Palm Beach Florida,
Only choose "I have a prescription" if your doctor can validate and has prescribed this specific drug.

Step 2. Your Order Is Processed

Once we receive your prescription from your doctor, we will process your order. We only authorize your credit card at checkout and won't charge your card until we obtain a valid prescription.

Step 3. Your Medication Is Shipped

Your medication is on its way! We ship directly to your door. Never wait in a pharmacy line again!

Priced Per Pill

Common 30-Day Supply: 30-60

Glipizide, generic Glucotrol, is prescribed as an adjunct therapy along with diet and exercise, and sometimes with other medications, to treat Type 2 diabetes.

Prescription Product: We will ask for your prescription information after checkout.

Glipizide For For Type 2 Diabetes Management

Glipizide, generic Glucotrol, is a sulfonylurea prescribed to treat Type II diabetes. Its mechanic of action is to increase the insulin production by the pancreas, which in turn lowers blood sugar.

Therefore if your body is unable to produce insulin, in the case of Type I diabetes, you will not be prescribed glipizide. Additionally, if you have Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), a condition that can occur if Type I diabetes is left untreated, glipizide will not be prescribed.

To ensure that we provide you with the best price, we may substitute one generic for another.

Before taking glipizide:

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to glipizide, any other medications, or any of the ingredients in glipizide. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the ingredients.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin); aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn); beta blockers such as atenolol (Tenormin), labetalol (Normodyne), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL), nadolol (Corgard), and propranolol (Inderal); calcium channel blockers such as amlodipine (Norvasc), diltiazem (Cardizem, Dilacor, Tiazac, others), felodipine (Plendil), isradipine (DynaCirc), nicardipine (Cardene), nifedipine (Adalat, Procardia), nimodipine (Nimotop), nisoldipine (Sular), and verapamil (Calan, Isoptin, Verelan); chloramphenicol; cimetidine (Tagamet); diuretics ('water pills'); fluconazole (Diflucan); hormone replacement therapy and hormonal contraceptives (birth control pills, patches, rings, implants, and injections); insulin or other medications to treat high blood sugar or diabetes; isoniazid (INH); MAO inhibitors such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), and tranylcypromine (Parnate); medications for asthma and colds; medications for mental illness and nausea; miconazole (Monistat); niacin; oral steroids such as dexamethasone (Decadron, Dexone), methylprednisolone (Medrol), and prednisone (Deltasone); phenytoin (Dilantin); probenecid (Benemid); salicylate pain relievers such as choline magnesium trisalicylate, choline salicylate (Arthropan), diflunisal (Dolobid), magnesium salicylate (Doan's, others), and salsalate (Argesic, Disalcid, Salgesic); sulfa antibiotics such as co-trimoxazole (Bactrim, Septra); sulfasalazine (Azulfidine); and thyroid medications. Also be sure to tell your doctor or pharmacist if you stop taking any medications while taking glipizide. Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had G6PD deficiency (an inherited condition causing premature destruction of red blood cells or hemolytic anemia); if you have hormone disorders involving the adrenal, pituitary, or thyroid gland; or if you have heart, kidney, or liver disease.
  • If you are taking the extended-release tablet, tell your doctor if you have short bowel syndrome (a condition where part of the intestine has been removed by surgery, damaged by disease, or you were born without part of your intestines); you have narrowing or a blockage of the intestines; or if you have ongoing diarrhea.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking glipizide, call your doctor.
  • if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking glipizide.
    ask your doctor about the safe use of alcoholic beverages while you are taking glipizide.
  • Alcohol may make the side effects of glipizide worse. Consuming alcohol while taking glipizide also rarely may cause symptoms such as flushing (reddening of the face), headache, nausea, vomiting, chest pain, weakness, blurred vision, mental confusion, sweating, choking, breathing difficulty, and anxiety.

Plan to avoid unnecessary or prolonged exposure to sunlight and to wear protective clothing, sunglasses, and sunscreen. Glipizide may make your skin sensitive to sunlight.
ask your doctor what to do if you get sick, develop an infection or fever, experience unusual stress, or are injured. These conditions can affect your blood sugar and the amount of glipizide you may need.

Be sure to follow all exercise and dietary recommendations made by your doctor or dietitian. It is important to eat a healthy diet, exercise regularly, and lose weight if necessary.

Before you start to take glipizide, ask you doctor what you should do if you forget to take a dose. Write these directions down so that you can refer to them later.

However, as a general rule, take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. If it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.

Glipizide may cause changes in your blood sugar. You should know the symptoms of low and high blood sugar and what to do if you have these symptoms.

Glipizide may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • diarrhea
  • gas
  • feeling jittery
  • dizziness
  • uncontrollable shaking of a part of the body
  • red or itchy skin
  • rash
  • hives
  • blisters

Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of these symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

  • yellowing of the skin or eyes
  • light-colored stools
  • dark urine
  • pain in the upper right part of the stomach
  • unusual bruising or bleeding
  • fever
  • sore throat

 

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088)

In one study, people who took a medication similar to glipizide to treat their diabetes were more likely to die of heart problems than people who were treated with insulin and diet changes. Talk to your doctor about the risks of taking glipizide. >Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). It is important to keep all medication out of sight and reach of children as many containers (such as weekly pill minders and those for eye drops, creams, patches, and inhalers) are not child-resistant and young children can open them easily. To protect young children from poisoning, always lock safety caps and immediately place the medication in a safe location – one that is up and away and out of their sight and reach. http://www.upandaway.org.

Unneeded medications should be disposed of in special ways to ensure that pets, children, and other people cannot consume them. However, you should not flush this medication down the toilet. Instead, the best way to dispose of your medication is through a medicine take-back program. Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA's Safe Disposal of Medicines website (http://goo.gl/c4Rm4p) for more information if you do not have access to a take-back program.

In case of overdose, call the poison control helpline at 1-800-222-1222. Information is also available online at https://www.poisonhelp.org/help. If the victim has collapsed, had a seizure, has trouble breathing, or can't be awakened, immediately call emergency services at 911.

Symptoms of overdose may include hypoglycemia symptoms as well as the following:

  • seizures
  • loss of consciousness

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your blood sugar and urine sugar levels should be checked regularly to determine your response to glipizide. Your doctor may order other lab tests, including glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), to check your response to glipizide. Your doctor will also tell you how to check your response to this medication by measuring your blood or urine sugar levels at home. Follow these instructions carefully.

If you are taking the extended-release tablets you may notice something that looks like a tablet in your bowel movement. This is just the empty tablet shell, and this does not mean that you did not get your complete dose of medication.

You should always wear a diabetic identification bracelet to be sure you get proper treatment in an emergency.

Do not let anyone else take your medication. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about refilling your prescription.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

This Product Is FSA/HSA Eligible

Score! You may purchase this product by simply using your FSA/HSA debit card at checkout.

How Do I Use My FSA/HSA Debit Card At MintRx?

  • Place all of your qualifying items in your cart. All MintRx prescriptions, including our custom-made medications, are approved for FSA and HSA purchase. Also, use your FSA/HSA debit for qualified over-the-counter items such as at-home lab tests and acne treatments. We've marked each FSA/HSA eligible item with a badge.
  • Make your purchase using your debit card.

What If I Want To Purchase Items That Are Not FSA/HSA Approved?

If you are also buying non-eligible FSA/HSA items, you are required to make a separate transaction.

What Are FSA and HSA Accounts?

FSA's and HSA's are federal programs that make it easy for you to enjoy significant tax benefits for qualified out-of-pocket medical expenses. Each program works a little differently but with each you avoid federal, state and local income taxes on any funds that you use for qualified medical expenses.

FSA tax benefits are administered by your job. Funds in an amount that you decide —within the program limits—are withdrawn from your paycheck without any payroll tax deductions.

Tax benefits with an HSA may be administered that way but there are also other options.

How Do I Use My FSA/HSA Funds?

You can use a pre-loaded debit card or get reimbursed from your FSA or HSA account after you make your purchase or a combination of both methods.

Write Your Own Review
You're reviewing:Glipizide - Generic Glucotrol
Your Rating